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Hot House 2016

06 Dec - 08 Dec 2016

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Ambrus Ivanyos - PLACCC © Mathias Prinz
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Chris Haring / Liquid Loft - Wellness © David Payr
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Angie Dight - untitled shoot © Angie Dight
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Bas van Rijnsoever - Project we light amsterdam © Bas van Rijnsoever
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Daniel Marcus Clark - EarFilms © Daniel Marcus Clark
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Dukagjin Podrimaj - X-TERR © Dukagjin Podrimaj
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Franklin Roulot / La Fabrique Royale - 0° © Franklin Roulot
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Laure Terrier / Cie Jeanne Simone - Nous Sommes © AC Paredes
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Mesut Arslan - Nachtelijk Symposium © Mesut Arslan
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Richard Wiesner - Twenty-eight © Richard Wiesner
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Sarah Leghissa © Sarah Leghissa
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Seth Honnor - Listening tree / Kaleider and Mercurial Wrestler © Seth Honnor
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Thomas Chaussebourg - Ma bête noire © François Chaussebourg
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Torbjørn Davidsen / De Utvalgte © Torblorn Davidsen
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Vera Maeder - Hello Earth / Life in the universe © Vera Maeder
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ICI Même - First Life © ICI Même (Paris)

Hot House in brief

3 days of artistic laboratory

16 artists

20 programmers and professionals

With one common goal: to get to meet each other and discuss new artistic projects ; to share our views on art in public space, and to grow from the others’ experiences.

With one common spirit: open-mindedness, respect, and benevolence.

With one advise: be ready to share on artistic practices, ideas and intentions! Hot houses are organised in the frame of IN SITU ACT, a 4-year cooperation project that started in November 2016.

Artists’ projects through the scope of Antoine Pickels

The Hot House, an intimate meeting for intense discussion between partners of IN SITU, the European platform for artistic creation in public space was held in Dommelhof (Neerplet) from 6 to 8 December 2016. Sixteen artists and the same number of festival directors and artistic directors met to discuss a topic in perfect harmony with the location: “What do they want to explore?” Over three long days of hard work, broken up by a few cigarette and coffee breaks and a frugal lunch, the artists and professionals from Italy, France, Norway, Austria, England, Kosovo, Denmark, Belgium, Czech Republic, Netherlands and Hungary presented their projects of varying forms and a whole range of aesthetics. What can be shown and what can’t? How can we take over public space and work with it? What new aspects are involved? Participants took the opportunity to extend the definition of public space, while lamenting the fact that it is shrinking so much.

A number of artists use technological “prosthetics” (mainly smartphones) to access the works. Four projects give them a central role and three others use them as components which can be used to view the work in one way or another. This is far from the majority of projects, but it is striking, given the relative newness of this trend, and the fact that we were not all “born digital”. 

Many projects claim to be “experiments” with the audience, sometimes even “social experiments”. Some of them are mobile and use an itinerant approach. These journeys for audiences are generally closely supervised, whether walking with Laure Terrier, taking the car with Dukagjin Podrimaj, or via a mobile telephone which often serves as a guide or interface (especially for Mark Etc, Mesut Arslan, Bas van Rijnsoever, Daniel Marcus Clark, etc.) Various projects focus on the idea of communities, the communities we work with, or the communities we build, whether it's the “village” dreamt up by Bas van Rijnsoever, the international tribe evoked by Franklin Roulot, or a temporary community created for communal sleeping at the initiative of Vera Maeder...

Several other projects seek to explore or reinvent a myth, or an aspect of identity or cultural heritage, and demonstrate the importance of this common imaginary world. Some projects rely on the participation of spectators. But participation ranges from the “act” that we perform when, for example, we pull out our digital “prosthetic”, to more significant engagement, such as sleeping alongside people we do not know (Vera Maeder) or investing money in a community project that we know nothing about (Seth Honnor).
It is also clear that despite the emphasis on digital technologies, five projects (those of Chris Haring, Franklin Roulot, Thomas Chaussebourg, Tørbjorn Davidsen and Laure Terrier) give a central role to body language. Old habits die hard for heritage and transmission in this area, with the teachings of Eugenio Barba and Julyen Hamilton, Contact Improvisation, Body Mind Centering or “physical theatre”, alongside new practices such as parkour (free running).